Strong and stable; are the Tories really better on the economy?

By Shaun van Eeden

Since the Conservative party came into power in 2010, we’ve been given a healthy dose of austerity to cure what was portrayed as a debt problem caused by a spendthrift Labour government. This austerity pill would cure the illness of public debt that the Tories said was holding the economy back. We had to ‘live within our means’.

This position implied that our debt to GDP position was firstly a result of too much public spending which was, to put it lightly, a deliberate misrepresentation of the facts. It was the bank bailouts arising from the global financial crisis that caused the huge deficit. It implied, secondly, that our debt levels posed an immediate existential crisis – que the inevitable comparisons with Greece and other Eurozone member states with budget crises – that required drastic cuts to public expenditure. Continue reading “Strong and stable; are the Tories really better on the economy?”

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“Breaking point”: How Slovenia has abandoned Farage’s corn-field refugees

By Svit Senković

Last week my home country, Slovenia, took the lead in Europe’s tragic race to the right. In a move that would make Donald Trump tweet with joy, the Slovenian parliament adopted amendments to the Aliens Act, which now provides the government with the legal ability to shut the border completely to any migrant or refugee trying to enter. The law, which is most likely unconstitutional and in breach of Slovenia`s international obligations regarding the protection of refugees, was proposed by the governing “central-left” Party of Modern Centre, led by Prime Minister Miro Cerar. In a sad twist of irony, Dr Cerar is a well-known law professor, and an expert on human rights; he was actually my professor when I studied law at the University of Ljubljana. Continue reading ““Breaking point”: How Slovenia has abandoned Farage’s corn-field refugees”

Donald Trump and Theresa May: a special kind of “special relationship”

By Baba Ruckus

We all want to be special. Some people think they are special. Some people think that rainbows and the uncompromising love of a mother for her child are special. However, if you’ve followed much of the coverage of Theresa May’s visit to America last week you’d be forgiven for thinking that there is nothing more special than “the special relationship”. So, what’s so special about the special relationship? And what are its implications for Britain under the right-wing administration of Donald Trump and Theresa May’s vision for Brexit? SPOILER ALERT: The implications are very special. Continue reading “Donald Trump and Theresa May: a special kind of “special relationship””

One of our Bloggers is now banned from the U.S. Oppose the Muslim ban

By The Griot contributors

President Trump has signed an Executive Order that effectively bans nationals from 7 countries from entering the U.S, including one of our contributors. Nationals of Yemen, Somalia, Syria, Iraq, Libya, Iran and Sudan are being turned away at their point of departure and detained or deported at US airports upon arrival. We condemn this Executive Order. Continue reading “One of our Bloggers is now banned from the U.S. Oppose the Muslim ban”

Theresa May and Donald Trump have their fingers on the nuclear trigger – do you feel safe?

By Shaun van Eeden

“In Hiroshima, 30 days after the first atomic bomb destroyed the city and shook the world, people are still dying, mysteriously and horribly – people who were uninjured by the cataclysm – from an unknown something which I can only describe as atomic plague. Hiroshima does not look like a bombed city. It looks as if a monster steamroller had passed over it and squashed it out of existence. I write these facts as dispassionately as i can in the hope they will act as a warning to the world.”

William Burchett, first journalist to enter Hiroshima. 1945. Continue reading “Theresa May and Donald Trump have their fingers on the nuclear trigger – do you feel safe?”

Donald Trump, an honest reflection

By Abraham Anansi

Like many of you, I woke up in the early afternoon of January 1st 2017 hungover, dishevelled and bedraggled. I dragged myself to the bathroom and, raising my head slowly, I carried out the important task of staring back at myself in the mirror. ‘You idiot’, I thought, ‘you’ve done this to yourself, now fix it’.

The election of Donald Trump as the next ‘leader of’ the ‘free world’ has taken many by shock and a good portion of those, by horror.

But I propose that on a number of major issues, Trump is a far more honest reflection of today’s America than his predecessor. Furthermore, Trump may actually act as the bitter antidote for Western apathy to what should already have been an unpalatable status quo. Continue reading “Donald Trump, an honest reflection”

From Lindsey German to Jeremy Corbyn: Peter Tatchell’s one man quest to thwart the planet’s worst human rights abusers

By Baba Ruckus

If I’m honest, I felt a little apprehensive when asked to write something for the nascent Griot blog over the Christmas break. I’ve never written an article or blog before and wanted my first contribution to be both pertinent and interesting. However, with the majority of my limited free time over the festive period already accounted for by an unforgiving schedule of eating, wanking and watching the much maligned Hobbit trilogy, this seemed an unlikely outcome. Continue reading “From Lindsey German to Jeremy Corbyn: Peter Tatchell’s one man quest to thwart the planet’s worst human rights abusers”

Whitewashing of history and misrepresentation of facts: the ongoing attempt to smear Stop the War Coalition

By Shaun van Eeden

A couple of weeks ago blogger Paul Canning published an article attacking Stop the War Coalition (StWC) and its Convenor Lindsey German branding her ‘a thug, an accomplice’. This was retweeted by Peter Tatchell, the activist who disrupted Jeremy Corbyn’s speech on Human Rights Day. Continue reading “Whitewashing of history and misrepresentation of facts: the ongoing attempt to smear Stop the War Coalition”

The humanitarian interventionists are out in force – reflections on Tuesday’s debate on Syria

By Shaun van Eeden

Tuesday night’s debate in Parliament on Syria has important ramifications for the future of British foreign policy. This is because of the return of the humanitarian interventionists – who feel emboldened by the catastrophe in Syria – and our failure to intervene militarily in 2013. Continue reading “The humanitarian interventionists are out in force – reflections on Tuesday’s debate on Syria”